Halloween Safety Tips For College Students

Halloween SAFETY Tips for College Students

Halloween Safety Tips For College Students – Fall brings cooler weather, falling leaves, and one of the most fun holidays of the year: Halloween. Long considered a vacation for kids, these days you can find all ages dressing up and enjoying this spooky season.

Tips and treats aside, some Halloween traditions can be a bit dangerous. Luckily, Mulligan Attorneys has all the tips kids, parents, and college students need to have a safe and fun Halloween!

Halloween Safety Tips for College Students

best halloween safety tips for college students
Halloween Safety Tips For College Students
  1. Watch your drinking! Not all parties will have alcohol, but drinking might be on your agenda if you are of legal age. Would you please watch your alcoholic intake? All sorts of bad decisions can be made when you are not totally in control, or you might become so confused, disoriented, or unable to function that you are at risk. The most fun way to avoid all of this is to use the buddy system. Go to the party with a good friend and monitor each other’s behavior. If you see your friend doing something out of character, step in. Use a predesignated question or excuse to pull them aside and then figure out what’s going on. It may be the best time to switch to water, hot chocolate, or a soft drink for the rest of the evening. Or you could decide to go back home and continue the evening with a scary movie and popcorn. Remember, for this system to work, you have to trust the person to have your back and be honest with you, and you have to be willing to do the same with them. It would help if you also made a pact that you will not leave the party unless you leave together.
  2. Watch your drink–literally! If you decide to go to a large party, always pour your own drink or order it directly from the bar yourself. That makes it much easier to track how much alcohol you are drinking and ensures that nobody has slipped something into your drink. Also, never leave your drink unattended, even for a moment. If you do leave it, don’t drink it. Get a fresh drink to ensure your safety!
  3. Never drink and drive. It should go without saying, but we are saying it, anyway! Plan your exit strategy before you leave home. Designate a driver. Locate the nearest bus route, or map out the walk home. Is no designated driver available? Is it too far to walk safely home? Then, take extra cash with you and plan on taking a cab home.
  4. Let your friends know where you are going and when they should expect your return.  The easiest way to do this, of course, is to go with a group. Like the buddy system above, traveling and partying are always more fun when you are going with a group of people you know well, and this safety net of friends is the best way to avoid harm. If you are going to a party for members only, and your roommate or best friend can’t attend, make sure you give them an approximate time to expect you home. Then, if something changes, send a quick text to update them on what’s happening. That way, they will have your back if something goes wrong.
  5. Always have your cell phone with you. Call for help if you need it. Use it to post about your wonderful evening if you don’t. Either way, having a phone is an excellent idea!

Having a safe and fun time during the Halloween season is easy if you expect the unexpected and have strategies for anything that might go wrong or right. Whether you attend a huge party at a downtown venue or a small party at home with friends, we wish you a wonderfully safe and scary Halloween!

Halloween Party Tips for College Students

Long after their candy years, you can find most college kids at parties or hanging out with their friends on Halloween. Students new to themselves this Halloween should do the following:

halloween party tips for college students
  • Follow the law. Halloween is a night when many are tempted to play pranks or engage in activities they shouldn’t. Obey the law and refrain from engaging in anything illegal, such as vandalism or underage drinking. Remember that the penalties for DWI minors in North Carolina are very severe.
  • Drink responsibly. If you are of legal drinking age, be sure to do so safely. Use moderation and never drive under the influence. Instead, find another way to get home by calling a friend, taking a bus, or using carpooling.
  • Go with a friend. It’s always safer to attend parties with someone you know than to go alone.
  • Don’t go to / have a party with people you don’t know. Make sure you are comfortable and trust the person attending the party or the person you are inviting to your own.
  • Never leave your drink unattended. It’s a good rule of thumb to follow every time you drink, not just on Halloween. Take your drink with you wherever you go, and don’t accept drinks from strangers because you never know what someone might be trying to put in your drink.
  • Be strategic with your costume. For example, if you’re out all night, make sure your costume is warm. Or, if you plan on walking a lot, avoid wearing heels or costumes that restrict your movement.

Safety Tips for Trick-or-Treaters

Each year, approximately 41 million children will visit more than 120 million homes on Halloween night. While the safest way for children to make treats is with a trusted adult, not all children who go out on Halloween night are supervised. If you have kids going out without you this Halloween, be sure to:

halloween safety for college students
  • Come up with a trick-or-treating plan. Map out a route for your children to follow and establish a curfew for when they will be home.
  • Make sure they have a way to contact you. If they don’t have their cell phone, it might be a good idea to lend them one and make sure there’s an easy way to call you if they need you.
  • Have them use the buddy system. There is security in numbers. Children who make treats without an adult present will be safer in a group than alone.
  • Talk about foreign danger. Review what children should do if a strange adult approaches them. You should also stress that children should never make an offer to enter someone’s home or vehicle, no matter what.
  • Choose costumes wisely. Encourage your child to choose a light-colored costume to be more visible at night, or just put reflective tape on their costume. Children should also avoid costumes with masks or wigs, as these can obstruct their vision and pose a safety concern.
  • Always test makeup before the big night. Do a small makeup test on the skin inside your child’s risk to make sure they are not allergic before using more.
  • Teach children not to accept homemade treats. The point is, you don’t know what’s in homemade candy or food. It’s best to teach your kids to decline offers like this politely.
  • Talk about pedestrian safety. Make sure children know when and where it is safe to cross the street.
  • Please give them a flashlight. It’s not the worst idea to send them with extra batteries too!
  • Tell them to go into houses only with their porch lights on. It is an age-old indicator of whether a place is participating in Halloween, and generally, no porch light does not mean candy.
  • Make sure your children know what to do in an emergency. Teach them when it is appropriate to call 9-1-1, how to do it, and what to do next.
  • Tell them to wait until they are home to eat candy. It’s always best to inspect Halloween candy before eating it, and an adult best does it at home, where it’s brighter and easier to see.

Tips for a Safe Halloween

To have the best and Unique Halloween possible, here are some tips I learned along the way:

halloween tips  for college students
Halloween Safety Tips For College Students
  • Stay alert! It can be while you are crossing the street or walking; be aware of your surroundings and know where you are going. If you get lost, find a well-lit area to plot directions, or get on the Hope Shuttle (it’s free).
  • Pay attention to those around you. If you are worried about someone’s safety, let me know. If you see anything suspicious, call Campus Safety or 911.
  • If you will be a shell game, go with people you know and know the neighborhoods you would like to visit beforehand. Holland trick-or-treat is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Think about your costume: is it perpetuating stereotypes or appropriating a culture? Does he have anything that could be used or seen as a weapon? Does he make fun of people, events, or places? If so, press pause, think about the message your current costume conveys, and work with a trusted friend to find another costume.
  • Finally, if you choose to go out and consume alcohol, you should know that Hope College wants you to come home. Consult the spectator medical exception policy for more information!